New app puts CHS activity at your fingertips

farmer loggin in to MyCHS

Time. We never seem to have enough of it.  And every new tech tool seems to just add another online destination with a singular purpose. But not for CHS patrons. With a simple single sign-on, producers can see their CHS business activity all in one place, even if they have multiple accounts. Contracts, bookings, prepays, scale tickets, payment history and more for agronomy, energy, grain and seed business can be viewed, sorted – even downloaded – from anywhere, anytime. All from one, web-based app: MyCHS.

The biggest advantage? Saving time. CHS transactions are a touch away – whether in front of a laptop in a farm office, on a tablet in the field or on a phone in the tractor cab.

“I can customize what I can see,” says Lucas Goodwin, Minnesota farmer and MyCHS user. “Filtering is easy. And navigating between all the separate components, like the contracts and the settlements, is logical and quick.”

Lucas was among a group of CHS customers picked to give app feedback in small focus groups and then as a beta user, comparing the new MyCHS with the former Customer Resources tool. Getting customer feedback early and ongoing during the development process was critical to making sure the web-based app fit the way today’s farmer wants to use technology.

“It’s a nice upgrade,” he concludes of MyCHS. He was a user of the former application. The recent upgrade provides all producers doing business with CHS with the data they need to make timely, information-rich decisions.

“Our CHS producers have continued to advance and look for ways to become the best they can be in some of the toughest markets they’ve experienced,” says Megan Schmit, director, Grain Procurement for CHS Country Operations division. “Even our producers who may not have called themselves tech savvy are using more and more tools to better their operation and MyCHS is giving them access to their total business with us, not just grain.”

Megan was part of the CHS team helping connect with farmers and finding out what would serve their information needs.

“I’m excited that we’re not stopping here,” she adds. “We’re going to continually take feedback from our producers and employees to keep improving and enhancing this tool for years to come.”

MyCHS is a free web-based app, available to any farmer or rancher doing business with CHS. It’s easy to register here and start seeing what MyCHS can do to help you.

CHS reports $54.6 million of net income for third quarter of fiscal 2019

Company reports net income of $650.9 million for first nine months of fiscal year

CHS Inc. today announced its financial results for the third quarter and the first nine months of fiscal year 2019.

CHS reported:

  • Net income of $54.6 million for the third quarter of fiscal 2019 compared to $181.8 million for the restated third quarter of fiscal 2018. One-time pre-tax gains of $124.1 million in the restated third quarter of fiscal year 2018 were not realized in the same time period in fiscal 2019. One-time pre-tax gains of $19.2 million related to the purchase of the remaining 75 percent share of West Central Distribution, LLC were realized in the third quarter of fiscal 2019.
  • Consolidated revenues of $8.5 billion for the third quarter of fiscal 2019 compared to $9.1 billion for the restated third quarter of fiscal 2018.
  • Net income of $650.9 million for the first nine months of fiscal 2019 compared to $535.5 million for the restated first nine months of fiscal 2018, an increase of 21.5 percent.
(more…)

Top way to keep water out of your diesel

By Steve Hinds, Senior Business Development Manager, CHS Refined Fuels Marketing from the Cenexperts blog

diesel powered tractor in a corn field

Incompatible people are often said to mix like oil and water. But if you really want to talk about an unfortunate combination, look no further than fuel and water. Water in a machine’s fuel line can be a one-way ticket to trouble.

The good news about water damage is it’s preventable. Here’s what you need to know about diesel fuel water contamination and how to keep it from sinking your operation.

(more…)

Dicamba Cutoff Date Approaching

Dicamba cutoff dates are approaching for both North and South Dakota. See details below from each department of Agriculture.


SOUTH DAKOTA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NEWS RELEASE

For Immediate Release: June 17, 2019
Media Contact: Maggie Stensaas, 605.773.4073

Dicamba Cutoff Date Approaching

PIERRE, S.D. – The South Dakota Department of Agriculture (SDDA) reminds applicators that June 30 is the cutoff date for dicamba products.

The SDDA obtained Special Local Needs registration labels, also known as 24(c) labels, from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the following products: Engenia, Fexapan and Xtendimax with VaporGrip Technology. These labels establish a June 30 cutoff for applications of these products in South Dakota for the 2019 growing season. Applicators can use these products until soybeans reach the R1 growth stage, 45 days after planting or June 30, whichever comes first.

“While the weather has had an impact on planting this year, which I know is frustrating for many producers, the fact remains that warmer conditions in July increase the risk of volatility and drift when using dicamba products. The cutoff date is based on data which supports increased risk of drift after July 1,” says Secretary of Agriculture Kim Vanneman. “I encourage producers to explore the other products available to them once the cutoff date for use of dicamba has passed.”

Anyone applying Engenia, Fexapan or Xtendimax with VaporGrip Technology must also abide by the restrictions included in the EPA labels for those products, including recordkeeping requirements. Additionally, applicators applying or purchasing these products will have to complete annual dicamba specific training. Trainings can be found on the SDDA website at https://sdda.sd.gov/ag-services/dicamba/.

Agriculture is a major contributor to South Dakota’s economy, generating $25.6 billion in annual economic activity and employing over 115,000 South Dakotans. The South Dakota Department of Agriculture’s mission is to promote, protect and preserve South Dakota agriculture for today and tomorrow. Visit them online at sdda.sd.gov or find them on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.


IN-CROP DICAMBA USE SUBJECT TO NORTH DAKOTA-SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS

May 2, 2019

BISMARCK – Agriculture Commissioner Doug Goehring is reminding producers that the North Dakota Department of Agriculture (NDDA) has developed a 24c Special Local Needs (SLN) label for the in-crop use of Dicamba on soybeans. The federal label would only allow for in-crop applications no more than 45 days after planting or prior to beginning bloom (R1 growth phase), whichever comes first. The North Dakota 24c SLN allows applications of Dicamba on soybeans through June 30 or beginning bloom (R1 growth phase), whichever comes first.

In October 2018, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced it has extended the registration of Dicamba for two years for over-the-top use in Dicamba-tolerant soybeans, while also making new changes to the label.

The other label changes made by the EPA for the Dicamba formulations of XtendiMax, Engenia, and FeXapan are as follows:

  • Two-year registration (until Dec. 20, 2020)
  • Only certified applicators may apply Dicamba over the top (those working under the supervision of a certified applicator may no longer make applications)
  • Applications will only be allowed from 1 hour after sunrise to 2 hours before sunset
  • In counties where endangered species may exist, the downwind buffer will remain at 110 feet and there will be a new 57-foot buffer around the other sides of the field (the 110-foot downwind buffer applies to all applications, not just in counties where endangered species may exist)
  • Clarifies training period for 2019 and beyond, ensuring consistency across all three products
  • Enhanced tank clean out instructions for the entire system
  • Enhanced label to improve applicator awareness on the impact of low pH’s on the potential volatility of Dicamba
  • Label clean up and consistency to improve compliance and enforceability

“As a best management practice, farmers should strongly consider good weed management strategies such as pre-plant and pre-emerge products,” Goehring said. “Farmers should not rely solely on post-emergence applications of Dicamba or any herbicide for weed control.”

The new protocols will only affect applications made on soybeans for XtendiMax, Engenia, and FeXapan. The restrictions will not affect generic Dicamba on other crops.

Ready for Change

By Annette Bertelsen, from Spring 2019 C magazine

What happens when the world’s biggest buyer suddenly backs away from U.S. soybeans? That’s been a question on everyone’s mind since July 6, 2018, when the United States implemented China-specific tariffs. The move embroiled U.S. farmers and cooperatives in a trade war that hit the soybean world particularly hard. Spring USDA data shows 2018–2019 soybean export inspections down nearly 34 percent from the year before, with farms and cooperatives struggling to handle huge carryover and reduced cash flow.

(more…)

Local high school seniors awarded CHS Northern Plains scholarships

Five high school seniors from the CHS Northern Plains trade area have been named recipients of $1000 scholarships.
 
“CHS Northern Plains is committed to strengthening our future leaders and ensuring a strong future for our youth,” said Todd Oster, general manager. “Since the scholarship program started, it’s been an honor and a privilege to make an impact in the endeavors of our youth right here in our local communities. Congratulations to this year’s recipients.”
 
 
The recipients of the 2019 CHS Northern Plains scholarships include:

Cole Baumiller, Hazelton, ND, son of Scott & Corrine Baumiller
Tanner Kempf, Ashley, ND, son of John & Michelle Kempf
Alex Vander Vorste, Pollock, SD, son of Loren & Andrea Vander Vorste
Autumn Wieseler, Gettysburg, SD, daughter of Ben Wieseler and Deb and Justin Cronin
Lauren Wittler, Onida, SD, daughter of Matt & Sherise Wittler
 
In order to be eligible for a CHS Northern Plains scholarship, applicants must be a high school senior from the CHS Northern Plains trade area. A parent or guardian must be a customer of CHS Northern Plains. We encourage but do not require the individual to be seeking a degree or certification in agricultural studies.  Full details can be found on our website, chsnorthernplains.com.
 
The local CHS Northern Plains retail businesses deliver agronomy, energy, feed and grain products and services to North and South Dakota ag producers and other customers from eight locations, as part of CHS Inc., a leading global agribusiness owned by farmers, ranchers and cooperatives across the United States. Diversified in energy, agronomy, grains and foods, CHS is committed to helping its customers, farmer-owners and other stakeholders grow their businesses through its domestic and global operations. CHS supplies energy, crop nutrients, grain marketing services, animal feed, food and food ingredients along with financial and risk management services. The company operates petroleum refineries/pipelines and manufactures, markets and distributes Cenex® brand refined fuels, lubricants, propane and renewable energy products.

Check for underground utilities before digging

Whether your spring to-do list includes building a fence or planting trees – breaking ground should always be done with caution. April is National Safe Digging Month so remember, your best line of defense before digging is to call 811, a free service that marks underground utilities and pipelines. Many of these are less than a foot underground. 

The process is simple: Call 811 or visit clickbeforeyoudig.com three days before a digging project, wait for underground utilities to be marked and don’t dig within two feet of those markers.  

digging

It’s best to call 811 any time you break ground, even if you think you know where a utility line is located. “In the U.S., an underground utility is hit every nine minutes, causing dangerous consequences,” says Tina Beach, public awareness specialist for CHS. “It takes a lifetime to build a farm, and it takes just one free call to keep it safe.”  

© 2019 CHS Inc.